Liviu Rebreanu :: Danse Macabre

In editing

Danse Macabre

by Liviu REBREANU

Translated from Romanian by Gabi REIGH


Written in the interwar period and published in 1927 under the name Ciuleandra, this psychological thriller captured the imagination of Romanian readers. The book opens with a shock as Puiu, an aristocrat, murders his wife after returning from a ball at the palace. To avoid a public trial and prison sentence, his father instead arranges to have him committed to a mental asylum.

Discussions with his psychiatrist reveal the madness and passion of Puiu through the imagery of the wild Ciuleandra dance of the countryside, where he met his future wife. Unfortunately for Puiu, though, his psychiatrist also knew and loved her first…

It is also a story of obsessive love and paints an interesting picture of the lives of the Romanian aristocracy at the beginning of the 20th century. The work echoes the world depicted by Russian writers such as Dostoevsky and Gogol, as moments of high drama and emotional intensity are punctuated with ironic descriptions of the corrupt boyar class.


Details

  • Pages: pending
  • Trim size: 5″ x 8″ (127mm x 203mm)
  • ISBN
    Softcover: 978-4-908793-49-3
    Ebook: 978-4-908793-50-9
  • List Price
    Softcover: Pending
    Ebook: pending
  • Cover: pending
  • Download sellsheet (PDF)

In editing

  • Scheduled for publication in mid-2020

About the author
Liviu Rebreanu (1885–1944) was a member of a group of writers responding to the changes in Romanian society after the First World War. His 1932 novel The Uprising documents the peasant uprising of 1907, highlighting the class divisions in Romanian society and inspiring sympathy for the rural poor. Danse Macabre remains a popular novel in Romania, and the film adaptation was longlisted for the Best Foreign Film Award at the Oscars in 1985.


About the translator
Gabi Reigh was born in Romania and moved to the UK in her teens. She has won the Stephen Spender prize for poetry in translation and is currently engaged in a translation project called ‘Interbellum Series’ focusing on works from the Romanian interwar period. The first titles in this series were Poems of Light by Lucian Blaga and three works by Mihail Sebastian: The Town with Acacia Trees, Women and The Star with No Name.

The Sorrow of Miles Franklin beneath Kajmakcalan :: Ivan Capovski

In editing

The Sorrow of Miles Franklin beneath Kajmakčalan

by Ivan ČAPOVSKI

Translated from Macedonian by Paul FILEV


Miles Franklin, renowned Australian author and namesake of Australia’s most prestigious literary award, served as a nurse in the Ostrovo Unit of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, situated near Lake Ostrovo and Kajmakčalan Mountain in Aegean Macedonia during the latter part of the First World War (1917–18). Her determination to aid others guides her through the horrors of the war, encountering the field hospital staff including AG Pollard, a painter from Dublin with whom she shares a tent, and a young Macedonian girl named Lina Sorovičeva, whose life and world have been devastated by the war.

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The Narcissism of Death :: Svetozar Savic

In editing

The Narcissism of Death

by Svetozar SAVIĆ

Translated from Montenegrin by Vuk TOSIĆ


Arrested for the suspicious death of his mother, “Bernard Novak” explains himself, in court and in prison:

Spending the night by chance in a seedy hotel near a quiet cemetery, he hears the laughter and moans of a couple having sex in a nearby room. Unexpectedly excited by the event, he watches as they leave… and falls in love with the beautiful woman, who he immediately names M (for Midnight).
He recalls that he has seen the man before: Joko, a minor functionary in the government.

But why her? And why apparently in secret at an unknown hotel?
Obsessed with her, he tries to uncover her secrets. He arranges to “bump into her” at the dime store where she works, and she introduces herself, amazingly, as M! He continues unobtrusively stalking her, expanding their interaction until finally she writes her Skype handle on a newspaper he buys. The long talk begins, stretched over weeks of careful online conversation, gradually winning her trust at a distance, only to have his hopes shattered by his old, sick mother, who constantly claims new illnesses to worry herself and him about.

Their budding relationship shrivels and in despair he reaches out to M once again, in truth. And M comes to his home for dinner…


Details

  • Pages: pending
  • Trim size: 5″ x 8″ (127mm x 203mm)
  • ISBN
    Softcover: 978-4-908793-43-1
    Ebook: 978-4-908793-48-6
  • List Price
    Softcover: pending
    Ebook: pending
  • Cover: Pending
  • Download sellsheet (PDF)

In editing

  • Scheduled for publication in summer 2020

About the author
Svetozar Savić: I was born and lived briefly in Nikšić, Montenegro, in a pink apartment on Serdar Šćepana Street. A significant portion of my inspiration can be traced back to there, although I spent part of my youth in Novi Sad and Belgrade, Serbia, where I received a degree in biotechnology. I finally settled down in Bar and Podgorica, Montenegro. The South is for me; I’m a Mediterranean in both body and soul—the ambivalence of heat and storm.
I believe that I can make a contribution to literature. I grew up with it and it doesn’t mind poverty. The Grape-Stomping Vat was my first novel, containing short stories in the form of a novel, shaped by Vin de liqueur in the Square of Arms in Kotor, thematically cyclic, with a symbolical title The Chronicles of a Grape-Stomping Vat. The Sculptor, my second novel, is about sculpting one’s own life and those of others. It was nominated as the Montenegrin candidate for the Meša Selimović Award in Bosnia and Herzegovina.